Truck Drivers Exhibit on Instagram

The old saying a picture is worth a thousand words proves itself true time and time again, especially for social media sites like Instagram. Founded in 2010 and later purchased by Facebook originator Mark Zuckerberg, Instagram is an application that allows mobile phone and tablet users to edit and share pictures and videos. Networking platforms such as Facebook, Tumblr and Flickr are just a few places Instagram photos are distributed.

Through the use of hashtags such as #truckdriver (which already has more than 153,000 posts) drivers can share their photos and connect with like-minded folks around the world. It’s also a platform where drivers can engage in political debate and discussions on industry topics. For instance, hashtag #truckdriverproblems showcases more than 2,100 posts that feature a variety of pertinent topics relating to the trucking industry and the number of posts are continually increasing.

Hashtag #truckdriverlife features a lot of the trucking industry’s upside. With more than 5,000 posts from drivers, there’s a long list of smiling faces, beautiful photographs of trucks, and a ton of “real life trucking moments” available for public viewing.

Why are all these truckers embracing Instagram? The answer is pretty simple. The connection between truck driving and Instagram is a natural one. Professional drivers today are much more technologically advanced. They have to be considering that the inside of most trucks are usually more technologically advanced than many aircrafts. With all said and done, there is a natural carryover from working in that kind of environment to social media sites like Instagram.

One of the more interesting and controversial features of Instagram is that you can start your own hashtag at anytime and you can usually find a hashtag on just about any type of brand. Millis Transfer is even on Instagram. Check out #MillisTransfer and you will find more than 400 random posts. One in particular is a wonderful post from “christruckermusic” who offers a personal invite to be a paid tourist with us!

On his Instagram post, Chris says he is excited to carry on the Millis Transfer family tradition. He also loves being a 4th generation trucker. His Instagram has been shared with some of the following hashtags: #paidtourist, #millistransfer, #truckernation, #truckingoutlaw, #fourthgenerationtrucker, #countryboy, and #countrymusician. The potential exposure is enormous.

Other posts on the #MillisTransfer hashtag include one from #Truckingwithdogs, who recently shared a Millis Transfer Facebook photo that highlights someone’s pet sitting in the window of a Millis Transfer truck. There are also pictures of sunsets, stadiums, and even a shot of the “Drive Friendly” Texas Welcome Sign.

Because over-the-road truck drivers usually do capture the most breathtaking views, a platform like Instagram enables them to share some of those with the world. It would not be surprising to find that a lucky truck driver or two will someday rise to international fame via the sharing of photographs from the places they visit. A look at some of the hashtags like #truckersjourney and #truckersview is a strong testament to the amount of talent out there.

Overall, there’s a lot of advice on the internet for Instagram users on how to build their individual platforms. Sites like Gramlike.Com also offer fun and creative ideas to help illustrate favorite photos. These are just a few listed on their website suggested for Instagram use.

• I’m way up, I feel blessed.
• I cannot see heaven being much better than this.
• Don’t let anyone tell you that you’re not strong enough.
• Be who and what you want, period.
• Don’t be like the rest of them, darling.
• I wasn’t lucky, I deserved it.
• Whatever you do in life, make sure it makes you happy.
• The question isn’t can you, it’s will you?
• What do you think of the view?
• We all start as strangers.

With captions like that, it is easy to see why so many engage in sharing. While social media platforms are fun and innovative, it is a good idea to use them wisely and never while actually driving. With that said, enjoy the view of all the wonderful places out on the road. We look forward to seeing you at #MillisTransfer.

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Set a Record With Us

Truck drivers accomplish some amazing tasks. For instance, one driver logged 3,001,276 miles in a commercial truck between February 12, 1986 and March 14, 2009 without one single accident. Because of that, he earned the Guinness Book of World Records Title. To this day, no one has been able to surpass his record achievement. Do you think you have what it takes to surpass the most miles title? If so, the Guinness Book of World Records is interested in hearing from you.

Believe it or not, setting your own record has never been easier. To help you win that elusive title, the Guinness Book of World Records now offers an easy to navigate website with a free online application for drivers who can do amazing or uncommon feats. Those interested will also find a long list of fun and amazing titles that they can challenge. We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again–there are some truly awesome people in trucking. Thanks to the Guinness Book of World Records even more of them are now being acknowledged. If you’re interested in competing, simply visit the following links (Most Miles) or (Other Records). When you do, fill out the application. You never know, you could be the next title holder for something like “tightest parallel parking” or the “shortest driver” in trucking. You can even make up your own category. The possibilities are endless.

At Millis Transfer, you don’t have to hold a world record to get our attention. We think drivers who try their hardest and put safety first are record holders in their own right. That’s why we always go out of our way to recognize the many amazing accomplishments of dedicated drivers like Tom Atkinson or Jennifer Sterritt-Smith. They are just a couple of our own million milers who help to remind us all of the great things we can accomplish when we put forth our best efforts.

If you’re a dedicated driver, who would like to join a family that puts your best interests first and recognizes the hard work that you do, then give us a call. With great benefits, top dollar pay, and some of the best equipment in the market, you’ll be glad you did.

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Looking Ahead to the Possibilities

2017 holds a lot of promise. The trucking business in particular is expected to have budding opportunity. As published by the American Trucking Association, the driver shortage continues and the demand for truck drivers is expected to grow throughout the year 2020. An online financial blog reports that the main factor in the trucking shortage is the disparity between those retiring in comparison to the number of drivers taking to the road.

Analysts also believe that 2017 will bring us closer to automation and self driving vehicles in positive ways. For instance, Uber has bought a company in San Francisco that produces self-driving trucks named “Otto” and the company has made their first delivery with them, transporting over 50,000 beers to Colorado. While self-driving trucks are not slated to take over the trucking industry, they will begin to make a notable presence in the years to come. Along with self driving trucks, Uber is also promising flying cars. According to a white paper they published, Uber has already launched a fleet of them in Pittsburgh.

In a December 2016 report from the President of the United States, it was stated that the trucking industry may lose nearly 1.7 million jobs, but it will also gain new ones. Predicting which jobs will be lost by automation is challenging, as automation is not a single technology, but rather a collection of technologies applied to specific tasks. Some will be more easily automated than others and many positions will be altered in the years to come as a result of new advances in technology. To learn more, the report can be accessed here: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/whitehouse.gov/files/documents/Artificial-Intelligence-Automation-Economy.PDF

Automation is not the end of the driver, but the beginning of a new role and process of delivery for drivers. As the Executive Report states, “Some jobs may be automated away, while for others, AI-driven automation will make many workers more productive and increase demand for certain skills. Finally, new jobs are likely to be directly created in areas such as the development and supervision of AI as well as indirectly created in a range of areas throughout the economy as higher incomes lead to expanded demand.”

As 2017 gets underway, those currently working in and those entering the field, will have exciting adventures ahead in the way advances in automation and transportation technology impact the industry. Discussion of deregulation may also take greater form and lead to new opportunity. The benefits of the field are not yet even fully defined in the wake of this exciting, emerging semi-automated transformation. One thing is for certain, however, the possibilities are endless.

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

New Safety Initiatives to Protect Truck Drivers

In the days ahead, truck drivers may find increased focus on driving techniques and more options for technology that will aid in safer driving thanks in part to the U.S. Department of National Traffic Highway Safety Administration (NTHSA). As part of a new initiative aimed at preventing “all” truck fatalities within the next 30 years, The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Federal Highway Administration, and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration are partnering with the National Safety Council (NSC) to launch what is being called the “Road to Zero” coalition.

The “Road to Zero” coalition will provide more than $1 million dollars a year for the next three years to organizations working on lifesaving programs that protect truck drivers. Money will be made available in the form of grants to fund those efforts. According to U.S. Transportation Secretary, “Our vision is simple-zero fatalities on our roads. We know that setting the bar for safety to the highest possible standard requires commitment from everyone to think differently about safety – from drivers to industry, safety organizations and government at all levels.”

While the program is not yet at zero, FHWA David Kim said in a press statement, that there will come a day when there are no fatalities on our roadways, sidewalks or bicycle paths. Efforts are currently underway to achieve that. According to coalition members, the introduction of automated vehicles and other advanced technologies will play a crucial role in achieving the program’s goals—so will educational initiatives for the industry. As reported, “The Road to Zero Coalition will work … through concurrent efforts that focus on overall system design, addressing infrastructure design, vehicle technology, enforcement and behavior safety. An important principle of the effort will be to find ways to ensure that inevitable human mistakes do not result in fatalities.”

The program will initially focus on promoting lifesaving strategies like the use of seat belts and other truck safety initiatives. Education, engineering, enforcement and emergency medical services, according to the coalition, will all play pivotal roles in “driving down fatalities.” The coalition also plans to “lead” development of programs and technologies that protect truck drivers. FMCSA Administrator T.F. Scott Darling, III says the initiative will succeed if everyone works together to make safety our highest priority.

At Millis Transfer, we are dedicated to ensuring the safe driving practices of all drivers. That’s why we have earned one of the best safety records in the business. At Millis Transfer, the safety of our drivers always comes first, every mile of the way.

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Sizing Up Truckers To Make Safer, More Ergonomic Cabs

A study to analyze the “human bodies” of truck drivers was recently conducted by The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

The “Anthropometric Study of U.S. Truck Drivers,” as it was officially called, measured truck drivers because up-to-date anthropometric data, which plays an “important role in improving ergonomic design of truck cabs…has not been collected for decades.” According to the findings of the online report, knowing the average size of truck drivers will help engineers improve cab design features and reduce work-related highway incidents.

The study, initiated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), lasted for four years. During that time, information on 1,779 males and 171 female truck drivers was collected at 16 different locations in 15 states across the United States. Truck drivers were measured at places like the Mid-America Truck Show, the Great American Truck Show, and the Great West Truck Show. Only those with a valid Class A CDL were allowed to participate.

Findings revealed male truck drivers tend to be larger in body width and girth when compared to the general male population. A comparison of women truck drivers showed they were about the same size as the regular work population, but the sample size for women truck drivers was very small. Because of that, results may be somewhat inconclusive. Measurements from both men and women truck drivers, however, were utilized to construct “preferred body models” for women and men truck drivers that would be suitable to use in the design of new ergonomic truck cabs.

The study examined the way truck drivers sit, including measurements for things like sitting height, elbow rest height, buttock-knee height, thigh clearance, eye height and more. They also looked at the average hand size, shoe length, and shoe width. Information on age, sex, and race was also examined.

After the research was conducted, a total of 15 body models for both male and female truck drivers were constructed. Each model represented a unique type of body. As noted in the study, the use of these models will help to benefit the design of the “next-generation truck cabs.” The body models designed from the truck drivers, they say, comfortably represents about 95 percent of the trucking population. For those that fall outside the 95 percent margin, customized options may be more of a long term consideration.

Through the help of the research, it was determined that truck drivers as a group are not the same as models from the general population. Further, male truck drivers, on average, are a unique type of group in regard to size specifications. With that said, next generation truck cabs should not rely on data that is not specific to those who actually work in trucking. Otherwise, truckers will be driving cabs that were designed from a model that does not represent their true body characteristics as a group.

With the help of this research and thanks to the new data on size, truck cabs in the future should be closer to a custom fit, more comfortable, and definitely safer for truckers in general. Read more about the findings here: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2015-116/pdfs/2015-116.pdf

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

It’s Time to Thank Our Truck Drivers

In celebration of National Truck Driver Appreciation Week, it is time once again to say “thanks” to our 7.3 million trucking industry employees that help to move America’s freight. “Those who work in the trucking industry or personally know a truck driver understand the important work that these men and women do on the road each day,” said ATA President and CEO Chris Spear. “Truck drivers are safe, dedicated individuals who help provide our daily goods and I hope the public celebrates and thanks all 3.5 million of them…”

According to the ATA, the trucking industry provides one out of every 16 jobs in America and moves more than 70.1% of the nation’s total freight tonnage. “…more than 80% of U.S. communities rely exclusively on trucking for delivery of their goods and commodities – providing access to 21st century products to both remote rural communities and urban centers.”

Without truck drivers, we simply would not have access to the things we need—the things that enable us to live healthy and safe lives. Truck drivers do more than just deliver goods; they also fill integral roles in our societies. As noted by ATA First Vice Chairman Kevin Burch, “Truck drivers are incredibly vital to our economy, but they’re also valuable members of their communities, oftentimes serving as baseball coaches, pastors and volunteers. That level of civic engagement is a unique foundation of the trucking industry….”

As we honor our nation’s truck drivers throughout September, we also take a moment to remember the historical events of September 11th. An important day in our country’s history, it is also one that changed trucking dramatically. According to CCJDigital.Com, the events of 9/11 put even more scrutiny on the application process for HazMat endorsements and other related trucking issues. Now, more than ever, truck drivers play a vital role, not only in transporting goods, but in helping to maintain and secure those goods as well.

September is a significant month. It’s a time to recognize truck drivers and to remember 9/11. It is also a time when football gets underway and autumn finally arrives. While eventful, it is not so busy that we cannot stop to remember or give thanks for those who do so much for all of us.

All that we do and all that we celebrate, more often than not, is made possible or stems from the hard work and dedication of those in the trucking industry. With that said, it is with great pride that we say, “Thank You, Truckers” for all that you sacrifice and for all that you give—to the profession, to the community and to the world.

National Truck Driver Appreciation Week

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

FMCSA alert draws attention to smoking trends, health & wellness

According to HealthyTrucker.Com, the trucking industry is getting healthier. Many companies are now implementing driver wellness programs, offering drivers support and encouragement in their diet and exercise goals, and providing their drivers with access to healthier options. Trucking companies are not the only ones supporting health and wellness efforts. Truck stops are getting on the bandwagon, too. Choices that include everything from protein bars to more meals with vegetables and lean protein are now readily available.

Truck drivers are also making better lifestyle choices, like deciding not to smoke. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the number of smokers has been on a continual downward trend. In 2005, a total of 21 out of every 100 people smoked. In 2014, that number went from 21 to 17—substantially less than it was in 1965, when 42.4 percent of Americans smoked on a regular basis.

In attempts to divert from smoking, many turned to “electronic smoking devices” such as e-cigs, ecigars, e-pipes and other devices. According to a recent report from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), battery powered portable electronic smoking devices have been available on the market since 2007. Since that time, their popularity has sky-rocketed as the number and selection of products expands. According to FMCSA, “The devices contain a liquid, an atomizer or heating element, and a battery. When the device is operated, the heating element vaporizes the liquid which is inhaled by the user in the same manner as traditional smoking methods.”

While popularity continues to rise, so do concerns. So much so that the FMCSA recently issued the following safety advisory:

“The use of battery-powered portable electronic smoking devices has resulted in incidents including explosions, serious personal injuries, and fires. The explosions regularly involved the ejection of a burning battery case or other components from the device which subsequently ignited nearby flammable or combustible materials.”

According to the U.S. Fire Administration and various news reports, the number of incidents concerning electronic smoking devices could be as high as 1502. Incidents have occurred while the device was being charged, in use, and while carrying the device.

Click here to read the official safety advisory from the FMCSA: https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/E%20Cigarette%20Safety%20Advisory-FINAL.pdf

According to StopCancerFund.Org, e-cigarettes heat a liquid instead of tobacco. Because of that, what is released is considered smokeless. There are not, however, any long-term studies to back up claims that the vapor from e-cigarettes is less harmful than conventional smoke.

When it comes to being safe, prevention and education are always a good defense. E-cigarette representatives have said that e-cigs will “generally” not explode in your face, unless you tinker with e-liquid, use batteries not specified for your model, or disregard the instructions. That old adage, it’s better to be safe than sorry, should be applied where applicable. There are a lot of online support options for drivers who wish to stop smoking altogether. Visit https://smokefree.gov/ to learn more.

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Be Prepared: Summer 2016 Will Most Likely Be Warmer Than Most

This is nothing better than sitting behind the wheel, enjoying a warm breeze along miles and miles of beautiful, rolling highway. This year, however, things are expected to be a little warmer than most.

According to the June-August outlook from the Weather Channel, “Well-above average temperatures are expected this summer for the northern tier of states, from the Pacific Northwest into the northern Plains, Great Lakes and Northeast. Warmer than average temperatures will also extend from southern California into the central and southern Plains and Southeast. The only area where cooler than average temperatures are currently expected this summer is for portions of central and south Texas.”

While the warm weather can be relaxing and wonderful, heat can bring adverse effects. Warmer than average summers impact drivers and the reliability of transportation. On a 90-degree day, surface temperatures can easily exceed 150 degrees. Think about what that does to a tire. According to Consumer Reports, tire blowouts are on the rise, creating a number of potential dangers. Believe it or not, just having your tires properly inflated will go a long way toward avoiding such failures.

With higher than average forecasts, tires are not the only concern. Drivers must also exercise caution. It is important, for a number of reasons, to be aware of the temperature readings. Keep in mind that the temperature on a thermometer is not necessarily the temperature for which you should be concerned. The relative humidity in an environment can significantly affect what is known as the “apparent temperature,” or the temperature you actually feel. According to Healthline.Com, “If the air temperature reads 85 F, but there’s zero humidity, it will actually feel like it’s 78 F, whereas the same air temperature in an environment with 80 percent humidity will feel like 97 F.”

Because high environmental temperatures can be dangerous to the human body, it is important to gauge temperatures accurately. “In the range of 90 to 105 F, heat cramps and exhaustion may occur. Between 105 and 130 F, heat exhaustion is almost certain, and activities should be significantly limited.” According to Healthline.Com, “An environmental temperature over 130 degrees F is likely to lead to heatstroke.”

Have fun traveling, but stay aware of the temperature and humidity. Being cautious and alert are some of the most important keys to a safer, more secure driving experience this summer.

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Distracted Driving: No Call, No Text, No Ticket

There’s a growing list of penalties when it comes to distracted driving. Drivers should take note. According to new research conducted by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), the risks of being in a crash increases 23.2 times when commercial drivers engage in texting and/or distracted driving on the road. To combat risks, the FMCSA is getting tougher on when and how drivers utilize their mobile devices.

When you first read through the rules listed on the FMCSA website, it sounds much like what you would expect. Rules stipulate that drivers may not engage in texting and/or using a handheld mobile device while operating a commercial motor vehicle. Motor carriers are also prohibited from requiring or allowing their drivers to engage in texting while driving. Commercial driver’s license (CDL) regulations have also been amended with texting or distracted driving citations now listed as a disqualifying offense.

All to often, the devil‘s in the details. That would be particularly true for mobile phone rules. It’s not just a matter of not texting. A driver could also be cited for simply holding their phone at a stop light. Since violations of any of the rules could result in fines, disqualification, being prohibited from driving and more…it’s important to know there’s a lot more than just not texting when it comes to the use of your phone.

According to FMCSA, drivers may not do any of the following:

Use at least one hand to hold a mobile phone to make a call;
Dial a mobile phone by pressing more than a single button; or
Reach for a mobile phone in a manner that requires a driver to maneuver so that he or she is no longer in a seated driving position, restrained by a seat belt.

CMV drivers who use a mobile phone while driving can only use a hands-free phone located in close proximity. Rules governing mobile phone use apply to “drivers operating a commercial motor vehicle on a roadway, including moving forward or temporarily stationary because of traffic, traffic control devices, or other momentary delays.”

And for anyone unclear as to what constitutes texting… new regulations specify: “manually entering alphanumeric text into, or reading text from, an electronic device.”

According to FMCSA, it is very easy to comply with the new rules. Simply put: There’s no reaching for the phone. No holding of the phone. No dialing of the phone and certainly no reading or texting when the driver is in transit or stationary in traffic. While some drivers might be able to text without being caught, remember that call logs are always available via your phone carrier.

To learn more, please visit:
http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/Mobile_Phone_Rule_Fact_Sheet.pdf

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

American Red Cross Issues New Tornado Guidelines For Truckers, Provides Free App

Although they can happen at any time of the year, Tornado season usually runs from March through August. Most occur in the afternoon or evening. According to research from The Trucker’s Report, the United States, on average, experiences roughly 100,000 thunderstorms each year. Of these, about 1,000 develop into tornadoes. A look at this Youtube Video of a truck flying in the air is a good reminder of what a tornado can do to a tractor-trailer. Youtube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFjTYsAc53E

Taking Cover: Red Cross Issues New Guidelines

Part of being safe is being prepared and knowing how to take precautions. The following are the updated American Red Cross guidelines for tornado alerts and warnings.

1.) Identify how wide the Tornado is and where it’s going.

2.) If it’s coming AT YOU (looks like it’s sitting still) or touches down ON TOP OF YOU: STOP! Then, while staying in your vehicle, duck BELOW the dashboard and put (or leave) your seat belt on. This especially holds true for drivers who have newer trucks with driver’s side SRS/air bag systems… the air bag will help protect you.

3.) If it’s crossing the road IN FRONT OF YOU, stop your vehicle and get into a ditch BEHIND where you park.

4.) If it’s chasing your trailer, treat it like a steer tire blowout: Step ON the accelerator, Steer as necessary and get yourself out of it’s path.

Keep in mind that the safest place is always a building, such as a sturdy house or office building with a basement or tornado cellar. If that is not an option, you may be able to find shelter at a truck stop inside a deep freezer, shower room, rest room or under a counter. Make sure to run for the main building if a tornado approaches a truck stop.

Types of Tornadoes

It’s safe to say that most have heard the category listings for tornadoes. For each category, however, a certain amount of damage can be predicted. Here is a listing from The Trucker’s Report that highlights the type of damage usually associated with grade.

  • F-0 has wind speeds of up to 40-72 miles per hour. Frequently causes broken tree branches and roof damage.
  • F-1 has wind speeds of 73-112 mph. Will overturn mobile homes.
  • F-2 has wind speeds of 113-157 mph. Expect mobile homes to be demolished and trees to be uprooted.
  • F-3 has wind speeds of 158-205 mph. Trains and cars will be overturned.
  • F-4 reaches wind speeds of 207-260 mph. Buildings and walls will be leveled.
  • F-5 reaches wind speeds of 261-318 mph. Usually catastrophic damage. Homes and trucks can be carried considerable distances.
  • Help When You Need It

    Should you experience inclement weather, such as a tornado, Millis Transfer will be there to help. Your safety is always a priority with us. It’s also why we offer modernized equipment and the kind of driver support that helps you through the most challenging conditions.

    Along with a dedicated staff at Millis Transfer, there are also a number of apps for your cell phones, such as the one offered through the American Red Cross. It provides early warning alerts and helpful information like step-by-step instructions on what to do if cell towers or TVs are down.

    Get The Free App

    With the American Red Cross app, an alert will be sent to the driver, even if the app is closed, helping to reduce the chance of sleeping through a tornado. Anyone can download the free Red Cross tornado app by texting “GETNADO” to 90999 or by searching for “Red Cross Tornado” in the Apple App Store or Google Play. There’s also apps for hurricane, flood, earthquakes, and more.

    The app from the American Red Cross is just one of many options, growing in scale and popularity. There’s a long list of weather apps, some free of charge and some with a subscription fee, available online, that originate from places like NOAA and the Weather Channel. Most offer alerts and are full of information on how and when to take cover.

    When a tornado is coming, you have only a short amount of time to make important decisions. Advance planning and quick responses are often key to surviving. At Millis Transfer, we work diligently to help provide assistance you need. With some of the best equipment and driver support you can count on, Millis Transfer drivers are safer and more secure in times of crisis. And with apps like the one from the American Red Cross, drivers and their families have even more access to information that will help keep them safe in inclement weather conditions.

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

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    Millis Transfer, Inc. epitomizes the American Dream. Family- Owned and Operated since 1936.
    Work With Us! Millis Transfer is looking for Drivers. Apply Online.