Millis Transfer Makes the Grade

When searching for a trucking company, what distinguishes one from the other? At Millis Transfer, we believe it is not only the training a company provides, but the full package of amenities and pay options that the company offers. Since Millis Transfer first opened its doors in 1936, the company has been dedicated to providing a family oriented environment and has been focused on what it does best – transporting materials, safely and reliably. The company has earned a reputation for excellence. That has been a consistent ranking throughout the years, not only with customers, but with our drivers as well.

Survey information posted on Brightlocal.com states that, “Almost 9 out of 10 consumers have looked at reviews in the last 12 months to help them make a decision on a business. What’s more, 4 out of 10 consumers do so as a regular action.” It is no surprise then to learn that reviews are sought after and provided on everything from hotels and restaurants to driving instructors and transportation companies.

While online reviews are not full proof, people are beginning to put more trust into them. According to Brightlocal.com, 88% trust them as much as personal recommendations. In another survey regarding online reviews, 58% of respondents said they were likely to share their experiences about a company or product online as much as they were through word of mouth.

How well has Millis Transfer performed? What have people been saying about us? Here are just a few of the non-solicited, non-paid testimonials that we found online at one of top reviewing sites:

“I enjoyed driving for Millis Transfer very much. Lots of miles, home time requests always kept. New equipment. But I would have to say the best thing about the company is that I had a great dispatch. Friendly drivers. Terminals conveniently located.”

“This is the place to be for an over-the-road career in truck driving. New truck every three years. They really take care of you.”

The testimonials do not stop there. Other comments have indicated the following perks:

  • Free coffee
  • Tv in trucks
  • Shop gets your truck in and out pretty quick
  • No forced dispatch
  • Pays every week
  • Great equipment
  • While those comments are nice, what is even better is that Millis Transfer provides much more than that. That is why we encourage anyone interested in learning more about the company to contact our recruiting department. Not only can they provide more details on the things that matter most to you, they can assist you in more ways than you thought possible.

    Millis Transfer is not just committed to being the best trucking company on the road for our customers. We’re also committed to being one of the best for our drivers. Give us a call today and find out why we’re truly making the grade when it comes to customer and driver satisfaction.

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Looking Ahead to the Possibilities

    2017 holds a lot of promise. The trucking business in particular is expected to have budding opportunity. As published by the American Trucking Association, the driver shortage continues and the demand for truck drivers is expected to grow throughout the year 2020. An online financial blog reports that the main factor in the trucking shortage is the disparity between those retiring in comparison to the number of drivers taking to the road.

    Analysts also believe that 2017 will bring us closer to automation and self driving vehicles in positive ways. For instance, Uber has bought a company in San Francisco that produces self-driving trucks named “Otto” and the company has made their first delivery with them, transporting over 50,000 beers to Colorado. While self-driving trucks are not slated to take over the trucking industry, they will begin to make a notable presence in the years to come. Along with self driving trucks, Uber is also promising flying cars. According to a white paper they published, Uber has already launched a fleet of them in Pittsburgh.

    In a December 2016 report from the President of the United States, it was stated that the trucking industry may lose nearly 1.7 million jobs, but it will also gain new ones. Predicting which jobs will be lost by automation is challenging, as automation is not a single technology, but rather a collection of technologies applied to specific tasks. Some will be more easily automated than others and many positions will be altered in the years to come as a result of new advances in technology. To learn more, the report can be accessed here: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/whitehouse.gov/files/documents/Artificial-Intelligence-Automation-Economy.PDF

    Automation is not the end of the driver, but the beginning of a new role and process of delivery for drivers. As the Executive Report states, “Some jobs may be automated away, while for others, AI-driven automation will make many workers more productive and increase demand for certain skills. Finally, new jobs are likely to be directly created in areas such as the development and supervision of AI as well as indirectly created in a range of areas throughout the economy as higher incomes lead to expanded demand.”

    As 2017 gets underway, those currently working in and those entering the field, will have exciting adventures ahead in the way advances in automation and transportation technology impact the industry. Discussion of deregulation may also take greater form and lead to new opportunity. The benefits of the field are not yet even fully defined in the wake of this exciting, emerging semi-automated transformation. One thing is for certain, however, the possibilities are endless.

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    The Holiday Season Is Underway

    The 2016 holiday season has arrived. According to a recent poll, 34 million consumers started their Christmas shopping in September and one million had it done by October 2016. Early birds might have it wrapped up, but most will be traveling to retail outlets in the next few weeks for Black Friday and pre-Christmas sales. In fact, survey respondents indicate, 58% of holiday shoppers want to do their shopping in-person at stores.

    An interesting fact published online by the National Center for Business Journalism says that males spent the most money on Black Friday in 2015. All in all, we hear a lot about “Black Friday,” but most of us are not familiar with how the event got its name. According to History.Com, the phrase is related to the crash of the U.S. gold market on September 24, 1869. The most common reference, however, is about the retailers who go from red to “black,” earning the first profit of the year, the day after Thanksgiving.

    History.Com says the term “Black Friday” originated in Philly in the 1950s. According to their sources, it was used to describe the chaos that happened in stores the day after Thanksgiving, when hordes of shoppers and tourists flooded the city to attend a big Army-Navy football game that was held every year. Stores in Philadelphia wanted to change the name to “Big Friday,” but the phrase never stuck. Retailers did, however, reinvent the term “Black Friday” in the late 80s and that is how we came to know it as a shopping holiday.

    With all the sales and excitement, this can be a fun time of the year for drivers, with plenty of food to be found along favorite routes. As one publication reports, truck drivers traveling through Idaho can get a free meal on Thanksgiving Day at the Boise Stage Stop. There will be other locations that offer free meals as well. For those that do not eat out, utilizing a portable crock pot is becoming more and more of a popular trend, especially for health-conscious truckers.

    Thanksgiving, regardless of where you travel, is historically a busy time, not only in stores, but on the roads, too. PRNewswire reports, “One in four U.S. adults plan to make all of their holiday purchases by the end of November.” That means last minute shoppers are also likely to be out in full force as Christmas Day draws near. Driving this time of year can be a wonderful, festive adventure, but it is good to be extra cautious as well.

    Even in the hustle and bustle of the holiday rush, there’s still plenty of time for those interested in trucking to make the dream of driving a big rig a reality. We know there are a lot of choices, but we think you’ll find, no matter where you look, the best opportunities are here with us. At Millis Transfer, you’ll never be just another driver. You’re an integral part of a team, representing one of best companies in the business.

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Sizing Up Truckers To Make Safer, More Ergonomic Cabs

    A study to analyze the “human bodies” of truck drivers was recently conducted by The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    The “Anthropometric Study of U.S. Truck Drivers,” as it was officially called, measured truck drivers because up-to-date anthropometric data, which plays an “important role in improving ergonomic design of truck cabs…has not been collected for decades.” According to the findings of the online report, knowing the average size of truck drivers will help engineers improve cab design features and reduce work-related highway incidents.

    The study, initiated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), lasted for four years. During that time, information on 1,779 males and 171 female truck drivers was collected at 16 different locations in 15 states across the United States. Truck drivers were measured at places like the Mid-America Truck Show, the Great American Truck Show, and the Great West Truck Show. Only those with a valid Class A CDL were allowed to participate.

    Findings revealed male truck drivers tend to be larger in body width and girth when compared to the general male population. A comparison of women truck drivers showed they were about the same size as the regular work population, but the sample size for women truck drivers was very small. Because of that, results may be somewhat inconclusive. Measurements from both men and women truck drivers, however, were utilized to construct “preferred body models” for women and men truck drivers that would be suitable to use in the design of new ergonomic truck cabs.

    The study examined the way truck drivers sit, including measurements for things like sitting height, elbow rest height, buttock-knee height, thigh clearance, eye height and more. They also looked at the average hand size, shoe length, and shoe width. Information on age, sex, and race was also examined.

    After the research was conducted, a total of 15 body models for both male and female truck drivers were constructed. Each model represented a unique type of body. As noted in the study, the use of these models will help to benefit the design of the “next-generation truck cabs.” The body models designed from the truck drivers, they say, comfortably represents about 95 percent of the trucking population. For those that fall outside the 95 percent margin, customized options may be more of a long term consideration.

    Through the help of the research, it was determined that truck drivers as a group are not the same as models from the general population. Further, male truck drivers, on average, are a unique type of group in regard to size specifications. With that said, next generation truck cabs should not rely on data that is not specific to those who actually work in trucking. Otherwise, truckers will be driving cabs that were designed from a model that does not represent their true body characteristics as a group.

    With the help of this research and thanks to the new data on size, truck cabs in the future should be closer to a custom fit, more comfortable, and definitely safer for truckers in general. Read more about the findings here: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2015-116/pdfs/2015-116.pdf

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Heart Health and Truck Driving

    When you’re a truck driver, your heart health matters. So much so that drivers diagnosed with hypertension or those on medication to control high blood pressure often face challenges with DOT when it comes to certification.

    According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Guidelines, those with blood pressure that is equal to or greater than 180/110 cannot be certified until their blood pressure is reduced to 140/90 or less.

    What the Numbers Represent
    We have both a systolic and a diastolic blood pressure reading. The top number is your systolic and the bottom is your diastolic. Systolic represents the highest pressure when your heart beats or contracts and pushes blood throughout your body and the diastolic represents the lowest pressure that your heart relaxes between beats.

    Your Best Heart Rate
    The American Heart Association lists the most optimal blood pressure either at or below 120 over 80. (120/80).

    Guidelines for Driver Blood Pressure Readings

    The FMCSA rules on blood pressure are divided into three categories. Drivers with Stage 1 or Stage 2 readings have fewer restrictions and/or less frequent certifications. It depends on the reading.

    As published on the FMCSA website, “An individual diagnosed with Stage 1 hypertension (BP is 140/90-159/99) may be certified for one year. At recertification, an individual with a BP equal to or less than 140/90 may be certified for one year; however, if his or her BP is greater than 140/90 but less than 160/100, a one-time certificate for 3 months can be issued.”

    They also report individuals diagnosed with “..Stage 2 (BP is 160/100-179/109) should be treated and a one-time certificate for 3-month certification can be issued. Once the driver has reduced his or her BP to equal to or less than 140/90, he or she may be recertified annually thereafter.”

    Anything above 179/109 is considered Stage 3 and prevents drivers from being on the road until they have successfully lowered their blood pressure readings.

    Don’t Forget Your Medical Certification
    When the Medical Examiner electronically files a copy of your physical to the Department of Transportation, it becomes a part of your driving record in the Commercial Driver’s License Information System (CDLIS). If your medical certification expires before you provide your state agency with an updated one, your CDL privileges could be suspended.

    Monitoring and Maintaining Healthy Blood Pressure
    It is recommended that drivers monitor their pressure over time to get an accurate reading. According to the American Heart Association, “A single high reading does not necessarily mean that you have high blood pressure. However, if readings stay at 140/90 mm Hg or above (systolic 140 or above OR diastolic 90 or above) over time, your doctor will likely want you to begin a treatment program. Such a program almost always includes lifestyle changes and often prescription medication for those with readings of 140/90 or higher.”
    To help with monitoring the American Heart Association offers an online tracking program that can help high blood pressure candidates identify contributing causes. It can be accessed here: https://www.heart360.org/

    Along with regular monitoring, the American Heart Association suggests adjusting your diet to help prevent high blood pressure and/or lower hypertension.

    Diet Recommendations
    •Decrease your salt and limit sugar
    •Increase vegetables
    •Whole-grain, high-fiber foods
    •Choose Fat-free and low-fat or 1 percent dairy products
    •Eat More Beans
    •Opt for Skinless poultry and lean meats
    •Include More Fish, especially fatty fish contain omega 3 fatty acids such as salmon, trout and herring (eat at least twice a week)

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Cleaner Than The Others…

    There’s an online version of the game show “Family Feud” that asks the question: Name something, that if it could talk, would say “Wash Me.” Think about it for a second. What would you say? It’s probably no surprise that “vehicle” was the top answer, but it’s interesting that the word “truck” was not.

    How many times have you driven down the highway and seen an 18 wheeler with the words, “Wash Me” written on the back of the trailer? Perhaps the truck drivers who write these messages on their trailers are simply reminding the rest of the driving world to wash their “vehicles.” As noted, it is obviously not the “trucks” that need washing in the minds of the survey participants.

    Truckers or those interested in trucking should consider these results–45 people in the survey answered with the word “vehicle.” Only one person in the group answered with the word “truck.” Believe it or not, answers like “floors” and “socks” got more responses than anything related to trucking.

    Like the word “truck” in this survey, trucking is one of those professions people rarely consider. Truth be told, truck drivers are almost “too good” at their jobs. Since people almost never have to do without the essentials that are delivered by them, most people really don’t know what they have until it is not there. More often than not, it is seen as a field that is not so much taken for granted, as it is considered invincible. People don’t think about it because the transportation sector always comes through in the long run. The mindset is generally, “You can count on that.”

    With that said, truckers are “unsung heroes.” When food or supplies have been delayed at processing plants, the sight of an 18 wheeler arriving on location is a welcomed one. Few areas could ever be completely self-sustaining. As a result, the entire landscape of what we know is enhanced by the quiet work performed in trucking.

    A truck driver is frequently described as someone who simply transports goods, but it is not quite so simple. Updated statistics indicate that nearly one in five people are somehow employed through the trucking industry. Truck drivers save lives. They enable production. They put food and drinks on the table. They are the backbone of our society. The core thread that quietly connects us all.

    About Millis Transfer
    Mills Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Are There Truck Driving Jobs with Training?

    You know what you want to do, but you need the answer to one question: are there any truck driving jobs with training? Truck drivers make good money and get paid to see the country, but you know you’ll need a CDL. What’s the answer?

    Many trucking companies offer training or offer to pay for your training—after you’re done and if they hire you. Others provide the training and offer a job once you’ve successfully completed the training. That’s better, but not all of these programs provide the same quality training or even the same quality job afterward.

    Let’s face it—some companies are better to work for than others. Some companies treat their employees better than others. That’s why Millis Transfer and Millis Training Institute offer the best truck driving jobs with training.

    At Millis Training Institute (MTI), our mission is to provide students with the tools necessary for a successful career in the trucking industry. MTI’s dynamic training program is designed to ensure our graduates are ready to utilize their truck driving skills to make their career dreams come true. We believe that you should be able to grow your career while providing for yourself and your family.

    We provide experienced instructors who are proud of their careers and are eager to pass along the knowledge and experiences they have encountered over the years as both professional drivers and instructors. They deliver the best possible preparation for truck driving jobs, with training methods that are designed to help you become successful as a professional driver.

    New classes start every Monday at our four locations throughout the United States. You get high quality training in a small class at a time convenient to you. But with only six students per class, they fill up fast. Sign up is on a first come, first served basis, so choose the location nearest you and get moving into your new career.

    You will be able to land one of those exceptional truck driving jobs with training from Millis Training Institute. We want you to have a long, successful and healthy career. To learn more, visit our website or give us a call at 800-937-0880.

    How Do Trucking Jobs Stack Up Against Other Professions?

    Ever notice how trucking jobs and nursing jobs always seem to be available, regardless of economic climate? Maybe that’s because neither profession is a typical 9-to-5 job where you know what to expect when you go to work each day. Everyone would agree truck driving can be a demanding job, but how does it stack up against other professions?

    Pay

    Many recent college graduates have been hunting unsuccessfully to find a job that will help them pay off their college loan debt. By comparison, truck drivers are in demand, and many carriers are willing to help with the cost of training. A new truck driver can be trained in the time a new college freshman is still learning where all of his classes are, and be earning as much as most new college graduates.

    In the years a new college freshman is racking up debt to earn a degree, the new truck driver is racking up experience that generally equates to increased longevity bonuses. Trucking jobs involving long hauls and keeping a clean safety record can also increase bonuses.

    Benefits

    Unlike many jobs these days, truck drivers usually receive excellent medical, dental, vision, and life insurance from employers. Trucking companies understand that keeping drivers healthy is important to keeping drivers on the road. And unlike other jobs, trucking jobs do not lend themselves to being cut to part-time status. To find out about the excellent benefits offered by Millis Transfer, visit our benefits page at www.millistransfer.com/driver-opportunities/benefits/.

    While many employees—even manufacturing workers—see their hours cut to under 30 hours per week, truck drivers are unlikely to experience similar reductions. Given the shortage of drivers and the nature of hauling freight, the trucking industry is not susceptible to the reduction of hours trend other industries have experienced.

    Flexibility

    Few professions give employees so much control over their own schedules. Depending on the amount of time you want to spend on the road, you can choose local runs, regional routes, or long hauls. Dedicated routes provide a routine. If meeting family commitments is important to you, choose a family-friendly carrier like Millis Transfer works with you to schedule your home time.

    Being a Paid Tourist

    Even airline pilots don’t get to see the country and visit the variety of places available through trucking jobs. Imagine watching the sun set in to the Pacific Ocean in the evening and viewing the sun as it rises over the Rockies the next morning. Imagine seeing the fall colors in the Northeast every year. How about visiting a different national park every time you have a day off? How many Civil War battlefields can you visit?

    Truck drivers probably know the country better than anyone. They meet new people and see new sights regularly. There just isn’t another profession like it.

    Want to learn more about trucking jobs? Want to move your truck-driving career forward?  Millis Transfer would love to help you. To get started in your new carrier in weeks rather than months or years, visit our website or give us a call. Don’t forget to also join our online communities in Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

    How do I Know if a Trucking Job is Right for Me?

    Not every trucking job is right for every truck driver. If you’re new in the industry, you might be wondering what type of job would best suit you. If you’ve been driving in the same role for a few years or more, you might be bored and wondering if there isn’t something a little different you might enjoy more. Maybe you just want to know if answering an ad for a different company offering more pay is worth the risk. That is where Millis Transfer comes into the picture.

    trucking-jobHome time

    Perhaps the most challenging demand of any trucking job is the time spent away from home. Before you settle on any job, you need to know how much home time to expect and how flexible the company will be. Will you be doing over-the-road jobs requiring 7 to 14 days out at a time? If you are a new driver with less than one year’s experience, it may be expected.

    If you have important events like a child’s birthday or your brother’s wedding, will you be able to have the time off? Look at the long term. How long do you need to be with the company before you have flexibility in terms of scheduling? It might be worth a year of two-week stints for the promise of more flexible time or shorter hauls down the road, if you can see it through. One thing is for certain, Millis Transfer works with drivers to ensure as much as possible they don’t miss important family events. Don’t believe us? Check out our Facebook page and read some of the comments and you will see we are true to our word.

    Equipment

    What type of equipment will you be using? Will the carrier provide a new truck with low mileage? Will you be hauling a single type of trailer, or will the type and size of trailer vary? Different trailer types have different requirements:

    • Flatbed: Require you to strap down the load. Are you comfortable with that?
    • Refrigerated: Could have time-sensitive delivery schedules. Also, these types of rigs often have more equipment to break down.
    • Tankers: You will need additional permits and endorsements. Who pays for that?

    Pay

    For any trucking job, the amount of pay is often a deciding factor. Is it worth the pay to do what you are being asked to do? You will want to know how you get paid and how much you can expect to get paid. Usually, truck drivers are paid by the mile, and can expect higher pay for more experience.

    If you are expected to do something in addition to driving, such as load or unload your own freight, you should expect higher pay as well. You might also want to check into bonuses. Clean safety records and the longer you work for the company usually equate to more bonuses.

    Trucking jobs give you an opportunity to be a paid tourist, see the country, and meet new people. But each job is unique in its demands and its compensations. To learn more about opportunities with Millis Transfer, Inc., visit our website or give us a call.

    “Come In Base”—Ways for Truck Drivers to Stay Connected With Loved Ones on the Road

    When they head out to spend several days on the road, truck drivers often worry about leaving loved ones behind. You can be torn between supporting your family by hauling a load or being there for that birthday party or baseball game. Thanks to modern technology, you can come very close to doing both. Staying connected is no longer the problem it once was.truck-drivers

    Cell phones

    Gone are the days when truck drivers had to carry a bag full of change to dump into a roadside pay phone to call home. Cell phones have made pay phones obsolete for the most part. You can call anybody, anywhere, anytime. Of course, you shouldn’t be driving when you call, and you might find a few dead spots (no cell reception) on any given route, but there is no reason truck drivers can’t hear a loved one’s voice two or three times a day, if necessary.

    Social media

    Most smart phones also let you keep in touch through social media. Using Facebook, you can upload pictures of where you have been. (Again, don’t take pictures while you’re driving. Not that you would, but we want to make the lawyers happy.) Millis Transfer truck drivers are paid tourists; Facebook lets you share the great job you have with all your friends.

    If you need to stay up to date in real time with loved ones or the local scene back home, Twitter does that. Getting short updates keeps you in the loop on breaking news on the home front and in your local community.

    Face to face

    If you have Internet or a WiFi connection, you can take your communication to the next level using streaming video. Whether it’s Skype, Google + Hang Outs, Apple’s Face Time or a similar service, you can see who you’re talking to or what they’re talking about. You can watch your daughter’s dance recital or your son’s baseball game, and even play peek-a-boo with the baby, because the baby can see you too.

    Not only do truck drivers have more ways to stay connected to home base, the connections provide better interaction than ever before. The latest technology really does give you the sense of being there.

    As a family-founded and family-oriented business, Millis Transfer makes it a priority for you to keep in touch with loved ones. To learn more about what we do to provide you with a satisfying career while you support your family, visit our website.

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