Nine Millis Transfer Drivers Achieve Two Million Safe Miles

Millis Transfer is pleased to announce that nine of our drivers recently achieved the career milestone of safely driving two million miles. An amazing accomplishment, these fleet members have not only made highways safer for travelers, they have set a safety standard that only the best drivers in the industry achieve. “We’d like to extend our congratulations to each of them,” Dan Millis, Safety Director of Millis Transfer, said. “Everyone at the company is so proud to have these individuals as part of our team. Please join with us in recognizing their hard work and dedication.”

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration reported a total of 437,000 crash related incidents for the year of 2014, representing some of the latest research available. “It means a lot that our drivers are not only taking extra precautions, they are helping to reduce the number of incidents that occur. When you have drivers that maintain incident free records, it helps everyone,” Millis said. “Two million safe miles is a significant accomplishment and we are thankful to all of our fleet members for their diligence in achieving this goal. It makes a tremendous difference.” The following drivers are the new members of the Millis Transfer fleet to successfully reach this important achievement:

Truck 46005 – Frank Arpino
Truck 5818 – Tom Atkinson
Truck 7011 – Terry Caldwell, graduate of Millis Training School
Truck 5823 – Trevor Davies
Truck 6010 – Mark Ruffner, graduate of Millis Training School
Truck 5108 – Jennifer Sterritt-Smith, graduate of Millis Training School
Truck 5027 – Russell Thompson, graduate of Millis Training School
Truck 7066 – Eddie Vandergriff
Truck 46068 – Jeff Vanstechelman

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Sizing Up Truckers To Make Safer, More Ergonomic Cabs

A study to analyze the “human bodies” of truck drivers was recently conducted by The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

The “Anthropometric Study of U.S. Truck Drivers,” as it was officially called, measured truck drivers because up-to-date anthropometric data, which plays an “important role in improving ergonomic design of truck cabs…has not been collected for decades.” According to the findings of the online report, knowing the average size of truck drivers will help engineers improve cab design features and reduce work-related highway incidents.

The study, initiated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), lasted for four years. During that time, information on 1,779 males and 171 female truck drivers was collected at 16 different locations in 15 states across the United States. Truck drivers were measured at places like the Mid-America Truck Show, the Great American Truck Show, and the Great West Truck Show. Only those with a valid Class A CDL were allowed to participate.

Findings revealed male truck drivers tend to be larger in body width and girth when compared to the general male population. A comparison of women truck drivers showed they were about the same size as the regular work population, but the sample size for women truck drivers was very small. Because of that, results may be somewhat inconclusive. Measurements from both men and women truck drivers, however, were utilized to construct “preferred body models” for women and men truck drivers that would be suitable to use in the design of new ergonomic truck cabs.

The study examined the way truck drivers sit, including measurements for things like sitting height, elbow rest height, buttock-knee height, thigh clearance, eye height and more. They also looked at the average hand size, shoe length, and shoe width. Information on age, sex, and race was also examined.

After the research was conducted, a total of 15 body models for both male and female truck drivers were constructed. Each model represented a unique type of body. As noted in the study, the use of these models will help to benefit the design of the “next-generation truck cabs.” The body models designed from the truck drivers, they say, comfortably represents about 95 percent of the trucking population. For those that fall outside the 95 percent margin, customized options may be more of a long term consideration.

Through the help of the research, it was determined that truck drivers as a group are not the same as models from the general population. Further, male truck drivers, on average, are a unique type of group in regard to size specifications. With that said, next generation truck cabs should not rely on data that is not specific to those who actually work in trucking. Otherwise, truckers will be driving cabs that were designed from a model that does not represent their true body characteristics as a group.

With the help of this research and thanks to the new data on size, truck cabs in the future should be closer to a custom fit, more comfortable, and definitely safer for truckers in general. Read more about the findings here: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2015-116/pdfs/2015-116.pdf

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

It’s Time to Thank Our Truck Drivers

In celebration of National Truck Driver Appreciation Week, it is time once again to say “thanks” to our 7.3 million trucking industry employees that help to move America’s freight. “Those who work in the trucking industry or personally know a truck driver understand the important work that these men and women do on the road each day,” said ATA President and CEO Chris Spear. “Truck drivers are safe, dedicated individuals who help provide our daily goods and I hope the public celebrates and thanks all 3.5 million of them…”

According to the ATA, the trucking industry provides one out of every 16 jobs in America and moves more than 70.1% of the nation’s total freight tonnage. “…more than 80% of U.S. communities rely exclusively on trucking for delivery of their goods and commodities – providing access to 21st century products to both remote rural communities and urban centers.”

Without truck drivers, we simply would not have access to the things we need—the things that enable us to live healthy and safe lives. Truck drivers do more than just deliver goods; they also fill integral roles in our societies. As noted by ATA First Vice Chairman Kevin Burch, “Truck drivers are incredibly vital to our economy, but they’re also valuable members of their communities, oftentimes serving as baseball coaches, pastors and volunteers. That level of civic engagement is a unique foundation of the trucking industry….”

As we honor our nation’s truck drivers throughout September, we also take a moment to remember the historical events of September 11th. An important day in our country’s history, it is also one that changed trucking dramatically. According to CCJDigital.Com, the events of 9/11 put even more scrutiny on the application process for HazMat endorsements and other related trucking issues. Now, more than ever, truck drivers play a vital role, not only in transporting goods, but in helping to maintain and secure those goods as well.

September is a significant month. It’s a time to recognize truck drivers and to remember 9/11. It is also a time when football gets underway and autumn finally arrives. While eventful, it is not so busy that we cannot stop to remember or give thanks for those who do so much for all of us.

All that we do and all that we celebrate, more often than not, is made possible or stems from the hard work and dedication of those in the trucking industry. With that said, it is with great pride that we say, “Thank You, Truckers” for all that you sacrifice and for all that you give—to the profession, to the community and to the world.

National Truck Driver Appreciation Week

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Smart Planning Key To Improved Profits, Happier Holidays

Each year brick and mortar stores try diligently to predict what they will need for the holiday season. It is part of an equation for success. The onset of online shopping has expanded that equation to include an entire new dimension to the holiday shopping experience. Knowing how much of a particular item to order, according to retail managers, is the key factor to the complex calculation that motivates profit and keeps loads in transit. Smart planning, it is said, is really what enables managers to order the right amount of stock for Pre-Black Friday, Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and other significant shopping events.

Smart Planning is not only important for success in retail, it is crucial for the transportation sector. When the holiday season approaches, having all of your ducks in a row makes a big difference. Research shows those who are organized usually enjoy better holiday experiences, safer travels, and accomplish more. With that in mind, here are a few items to remember when preparing and organizing for your own holiday season:

Preventative Maintenance
Make sure all of your preventative maintenance is up-to-date. Unexpected winter weather is a lot easier to drive through when you’re prepared. Regardless of how often preventative maintenance is preformed, remember to check your truck at different points in transit, especially in winter weather.

Know Where To Find Shelter
Plan out your routes. Make reservations in advance when possible, when needed. Have places where you can take shelter. Monitor the weather and stay alert.

Personal Accessories
Make sure you pack clothing for varying weather conditions. If you do not already, get a pair of gloves, a scarf, and extra clothing should temperatures or weather conditions take an unexpected turn.

Decide Where You Want To Be During The Holidays
Whether it is on the road or sitting at the in-laws for Christmas dinner, early planning will help to make your holidays a lot more enjoyable. Pre-planning and sharing your plans will go a long way into ensuring everything goes smoothly.

Be Smart About Holiday Shopping
Holiday Shopping usually means more congested highways, even with increased incentive to shop online. The article “5 Safe Online Shopping Tips for This Holiday Season” says “Above all, to stay healthy and wealthy, you’ve got to be wise. Just as you would exercise caution with your wallet and belongings in a crowded store, remember to be as vigilant in the World Wide Mall.” To read more about safe shopping, click here:
http://www.webroot.com/us/en/home/resources/articles/online-shopping-banking/shopping-5-safe-online-tips-for-this-holiday-season

The holidays are always an adventure, especially for truck drivers. With a little pre-planning, however, the roads are sure to be a little less stressful and a lot more enjoyable. Take a little time to make this year one of your best. Do the necessary pre-planning.

About Millis Transfer
Mills Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Speed Limits: Some Trucks Can’t Go Faster

A recent article by the Associated Press says that “Big Rigs Often Go Faster Than Tires Can Handle.” According to Tire Review, the average speed a tire can operate without a blow-out varies on the brand. 75mph is considered to be the average speed a tire can go before it becomes a hazard. Depending on tire, actual speed could vary from 55-82 mph.

Speed limiting devices have been a point of debate due to the number of incidents involving high speeds, such as tire blow-outs and accidents.

“Setting speed limits has traditionally been the responsibility of states, except for the period of 1973-1994. During that time, the federal government enacted mandatory speed limit ceilings on interstate highways and similar limited access roads through a National Maximum Speed Limit.” According to the 2015 Governors Highway Safety Association, “Congress repealed the National Maximum Speed Limit in 1995. Since then, 34 states have raised speed limits to 70 mph or higher on some portion of their roadway systems.”

Not all speed limits are set by states. Rhode Island speed limits are set by the State Traffic Commission and West Virginia speed limits are set by the Commissioner of the Division of Highways.

Regardless of who establishes the speed limit, it is common to see variations on the highway. There’s usually one speed for cars. Another speed for tractor trailers. Speed limits can also vary according to the type of roadway, traveling conditions and whether or not it is day or night.

Speed limiters are mechanical instruments that operate through a series of electronic sensors that calibrate the vehicle’s speed and transmit that information to the engine’s computer. Once information is received, sensors determine whether or not a truck is moving too fast for conditions. If so, fuel and air are restricted and the engine cannot accelerate.

By 2017, according to Overdrive Magazine, speed limiting devices are expected to be mandatory for truck manufacturers. While that is limiting for some, a survey conducted in 2007 shows that 69% of trucking companies already have those kind of devices on at least some of their rigs, with an average limit of 69 mph.

Even with a growing number of speed limiting devices in place, the Associated Press cites increased speed limits in 14 states, mainly west of the Mississippi River, that now have speed limits of 75, 80 and 85 mph. For those who can accelerate to this speed, wrecks and blowouts remain a concern. It’s “a scientific fact that kinetic energy increases twice as fast as speed…” According to the website FairTrafficLaws.Com, “When motorists double their speed, they have four times as much energy to deal with and crashes are four times more severe.”

However fast you approach your deliveries, please be safe and cautious. “To assure safety on our highways, vehicle speed must be carefully considered by highway designers and traffic managers and wisely controlled by motorists.”

To view a chart of speed limits in various sectors, please visit this page: http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/laws/speedlimit_laws.html

About Millis Transfer
Mills Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Memories and Magnets

Let’s face it. On the road, there are a lot of opportunities to purchase gadgets and gismos. Those fun memorabilia items we like to bring home to loved ones and use to decorate our cabs—they certainly add some interesting insight into our lives.

When selecting souvenirs, you want items that will help make the most of your travel memories, while reducing the amount of potentially non-useful, soon to be a part of the junk drawer merchandise.

What keeps those travel impulse purchases from ending up in the trash bin? According to one travel guide, it is all in the selection process. They recommend asking yourself the following questions before you buy:

    Does it make you smile?
    If it does, go ahead and get it. When was the last time you regretted buying a small trinket or memento that made you happy?

    Is it too generic?
    Avoid purchasing items you can just get anywhere. When searching for mementos, look for those things not easily found back home.

    How functional is it?
    Are you ever going to use it? Maybe. Maybe not. Experts recommend purchasing items that have an alternate purpose that provide some level of functionality and use.

    Does it fit in the cab?
    This is a funny consideration, but a necessary one. Make sure you have ample space for your purchases and the battle is halfway won.

    Does it remind you of the place you visited?
    Mementoes will have more value when you see a memory in them. A memory that means something special to you.

About Millis Transfer
Mills Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Best of Everything: Living Life in a Postcard, Enjoying Alone Time

Life on the road is a lot like living inside a postcard. There are extraordinary experiences. Memorable moments in rural and even isolated places. Unique sights in strange and beautiful areas. The joy of being a ”paid tourist” also offers something else that is rare and valuable. Plenty of alone time.

It has been said that alone time is “fuel for life.” Research highlights a number of benefits in having time to yourself. It helps to restore energy and lower stress. It offers time for self-reflection and an opportunity for hobbies. One trucker noted that she likes to make blankets. Others utilize downtime to exercise. Connecting online and doing a bit of web surfing is also a popular choice for alone time activities.

With the delivery of advanced technology, most of us are all “terminally in touch.” Yet, as indicated in research, “…in another, more profound way, we are terminally out of touch.”

Living in a postcard can be everything you dream it to be, but it takes a special kind of person to appreciate its often quiet and independent environment. While there are plenty of reasons to make the decision to become a truck driver, being one requires some unique communication and adapting skills.

As the miles roll away, truck drivers must make the effort and find ways to stay connected with those they love and to nurture long distance relationships. While it is different than most professions, there can be many advantages to a life of driving.

If you are the type of person who enjoys the freedom of the open road, is inspired by the the sites behind the wheel, likes the feeling of being your own boss, and wants to work for a company that treats you like a member of the family, than Millis Transfer is for you.

Millis Transfer trains and employs some of the greatest drivers in the world. Interested in being a part of our team? Find out about our available truck driving opportunities by calling (800) 937-0880 or APPLY NOW at www.millistransfer.com.

Truck Driving On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is a time to show gratitude for everything you have and spend time with your loved ones. What if duty calls and you end up truck driving on Thanksgiving Day? With the following tips, you’re sure to enjoy the holiday, even if you’re away from family.

Call Home

Modern technology makes it easy to keep in touch, even if you’re truck driving on Thanksgiving. Arrange a time to chat with your spouse, kids and grandkids on the holiday. Take it one step further by video chatting with your loved ones at home. All you need is a laptop, tablet or smartphone and access to Wi-Fi or cellular data and you can connect with your family on Thanksgiving.

Eat a Home-Cooked Meal

Who says you can’t enjoy an authentic Thanksgiving meal just because you’re on the road? Truck stop restaurants, churches and other locations sympathize with the hardships of being a truck driver. Many endeavor to boost your spirits by offering a special discount to truck drivers on Thanksgiving Day. Check which locations along your truck driving route are offering discounted meals on Thanksgiving to ensure you eat your fill that day.

Keep Other Concerns in Mind

The day after Thanksgiving – “Black Friday” – is the biggest shopping day of the year. It’s perhaps the reason you were called to your truck driving assignment on Thanksgiving in the first place. Expect the traffic to increase during this holiday time, and drive more cautiously to help you reach your final destination safely.

The weather also starts to turn bad in most parts of the country this time of year. Keep in mind that slippery roads, poor visibility and other hazards could slow you down as you make your deliveries. With this information in mind, you can stay focused on driving safely on Thanksgiving or every other day of the year.

If you have what it takes to live the exciting life of a truck driver, Millis Transfer is here to help you have a long, healthy and successful truck driving career. To learn more about how to become a paid tourist, call (800) 937-0880, or APPLY NOW at www.mtidriving.com.

Millis Transfer, Inc. epitomizes the American Dream. Family- Owned and Operated since 1936.
Work With Us! Millis Transfer is looking for Drivers. Apply Online.