Truck Drivers Exhibit on Instagram

The old saying a picture is worth a thousand words proves itself true time and time again, especially for social media sites like Instagram. Founded in 2010 and later purchased by Facebook originator Mark Zuckerberg, Instagram is an application that allows mobile phone and tablet users to edit and share pictures and videos. Networking platforms such as Facebook, Tumblr and Flickr are just a few places Instagram photos are distributed.

Through the use of hashtags such as #truckdriver (which already has more than 153,000 posts) drivers can share their photos and connect with like-minded folks around the world. It’s also a platform where drivers can engage in political debate and discussions on industry topics. For instance, hashtag #truckdriverproblems showcases more than 2,100 posts that feature a variety of pertinent topics relating to the trucking industry and the number of posts are continually increasing.

Hashtag #truckdriverlife features a lot of the trucking industry’s upside. With more than 5,000 posts from drivers, there’s a long list of smiling faces, beautiful photographs of trucks, and a ton of “real life trucking moments” available for public viewing.

Why are all these truckers embracing Instagram? The answer is pretty simple. The connection between truck driving and Instagram is a natural one. Professional drivers today are much more technologically advanced. They have to be considering that the inside of most trucks are usually more technologically advanced than many aircrafts. With all said and done, there is a natural carryover from working in that kind of environment to social media sites like Instagram.

One of the more interesting and controversial features of Instagram is that you can start your own hashtag at anytime and you can usually find a hashtag on just about any type of brand. Millis Transfer is even on Instagram. Check out #MillisTransfer and you will find more than 400 random posts. One in particular is a wonderful post from “christruckermusic” who offers a personal invite to be a paid tourist with us!

On his Instagram post, Chris says he is excited to carry on the Millis Transfer family tradition. He also loves being a 4th generation trucker. His Instagram has been shared with some of the following hashtags: #paidtourist, #millistransfer, #truckernation, #truckingoutlaw, #fourthgenerationtrucker, #countryboy, and #countrymusician. The potential exposure is enormous.

Other posts on the #MillisTransfer hashtag include one from #Truckingwithdogs, who recently shared a Millis Transfer Facebook photo that highlights someone’s pet sitting in the window of a Millis Transfer truck. There are also pictures of sunsets, stadiums, and even a shot of the “Drive Friendly” Texas Welcome Sign.

Because over-the-road truck drivers usually do capture the most breathtaking views, a platform like Instagram enables them to share some of those with the world. It would not be surprising to find that a lucky truck driver or two will someday rise to international fame via the sharing of photographs from the places they visit. A look at some of the hashtags like #truckersjourney and #truckersview is a strong testament to the amount of talent out there.

Overall, there’s a lot of advice on the internet for Instagram users on how to build their individual platforms. Sites like Gramlike.Com also offer fun and creative ideas to help illustrate favorite photos. These are just a few listed on their website suggested for Instagram use.

• I’m way up, I feel blessed.
• I cannot see heaven being much better than this.
• Don’t let anyone tell you that you’re not strong enough.
• Be who and what you want, period.
• Don’t be like the rest of them, darling.
• I wasn’t lucky, I deserved it.
• Whatever you do in life, make sure it makes you happy.
• The question isn’t can you, it’s will you?
• What do you think of the view?
• We all start as strangers.

With captions like that, it is easy to see why so many engage in sharing. While social media platforms are fun and innovative, it is a good idea to use them wisely and never while actually driving. With that said, enjoy the view of all the wonderful places out on the road. We look forward to seeing you at #MillisTransfer.

About Millis Transfer
Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

Millis Transfer Makes the Grade

When searching for a trucking company, what distinguishes one from the other? At Millis Transfer, we believe it is not only the training a company provides, but the full package of amenities and pay options that the company offers. Since Millis Transfer first opened its doors in 1936, the company has been dedicated to providing a family oriented environment and has been focused on what it does best – transporting materials, safely and reliably. The company has earned a reputation for excellence. That has been a consistent ranking throughout the years, not only with customers, but with our drivers as well.

Survey information posted on Brightlocal.com states that, “Almost 9 out of 10 consumers have looked at reviews in the last 12 months to help them make a decision on a business. What’s more, 4 out of 10 consumers do so as a regular action.” It is no surprise then to learn that reviews are sought after and provided on everything from hotels and restaurants to driving instructors and transportation companies.

While online reviews are not full proof, people are beginning to put more trust into them. According to Brightlocal.com, 88% trust them as much as personal recommendations. In another survey regarding online reviews, 58% of respondents said they were likely to share their experiences about a company or product online as much as they were through word of mouth.

How well has Millis Transfer performed? What have people been saying about us? Here are just a few of the non-solicited, non-paid testimonials that we found online at one of top reviewing sites:

“I enjoyed driving for Millis Transfer very much. Lots of miles, home time requests always kept. New equipment. But I would have to say the best thing about the company is that I had a great dispatch. Friendly drivers. Terminals conveniently located.”

“This is the place to be for an over-the-road career in truck driving. New truck every three years. They really take care of you.”

The testimonials do not stop there. Other comments have indicated the following perks:

  • Free coffee
  • Tv in trucks
  • Shop gets your truck in and out pretty quick
  • No forced dispatch
  • Pays every week
  • Great equipment
  • While those comments are nice, what is even better is that Millis Transfer provides much more than that. That is why we encourage anyone interested in learning more about the company to contact our recruiting department. Not only can they provide more details on the things that matter most to you, they can assist you in more ways than you thought possible.

    Millis Transfer is not just committed to being the best trucking company on the road for our customers. We’re also committed to being one of the best for our drivers. Give us a call today and find out why we’re truly making the grade when it comes to customer and driver satisfaction.

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Set a Record With Us

    Truck drivers accomplish some amazing tasks. For instance, one driver logged 3,001,276 miles in a commercial truck between February 12, 1986 and March 14, 2009 without one single accident. Because of that, he earned the Guinness Book of World Records Title. To this day, no one has been able to surpass his record achievement. Do you think you have what it takes to surpass the most miles title? If so, the Guinness Book of World Records is interested in hearing from you.

    Believe it or not, setting your own record has never been easier. To help you win that elusive title, the Guinness Book of World Records now offers an easy to navigate website with a free online application for drivers who can do amazing or uncommon feats. Those interested will also find a long list of fun and amazing titles that they can challenge. We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again–there are some truly awesome people in trucking. Thanks to the Guinness Book of World Records even more of them are now being acknowledged. If you’re interested in competing, simply visit the following links (Most Miles) or (Other Records). When you do, fill out the application. You never know, you could be the next title holder for something like “tightest parallel parking” or the “shortest driver” in trucking. You can even make up your own category. The possibilities are endless.

    At Millis Transfer, you don’t have to hold a world record to get our attention. We think drivers who try their hardest and put safety first are record holders in their own right. That’s why we always go out of our way to recognize the many amazing accomplishments of dedicated drivers like Tom Atkinson or Jennifer Sterritt-Smith. They are just a couple of our own million milers who help to remind us all of the great things we can accomplish when we put forth our best efforts.

    If you’re a dedicated driver, who would like to join a family that puts your best interests first and recognizes the hard work that you do, then give us a call. With great benefits, top dollar pay, and some of the best equipment in the market, you’ll be glad you did.

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Nine Millis Transfer Drivers Achieve Two Million Safe Miles

    Millis Transfer is pleased to announce that nine of our drivers recently achieved the career milestone of safely driving two million miles. An amazing accomplishment, these fleet members have not only made highways safer for travelers, they have set a safety standard that only the best drivers in the industry achieve. “We’d like to extend our congratulations to each of them,” Dan Millis, Safety Director of Millis Transfer, said. “Everyone at the company is so proud to have these individuals as part of our team. Please join with us in recognizing their hard work and dedication.”

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration reported a total of 437,000 crash related incidents for the year of 2014, representing some of the latest research available. “It means a lot that our drivers are not only taking extra precautions, they are helping to reduce the number of incidents that occur. When you have drivers that maintain incident free records, it helps everyone,” Millis said. “Two million safe miles is a significant accomplishment and we are thankful to all of our fleet members for their diligence in achieving this goal. It makes a tremendous difference.” The following drivers are the new members of the Millis Transfer fleet to successfully reach this important achievement:

    Truck 46005 – Frank Arpino
    Truck 5818 – Tom Atkinson
    Truck 7011 – Terry Caldwell, graduate of Millis Training School
    Truck 5823 – Trevor Davies
    Truck 6010 – Mark Ruffner, graduate of Millis Training School
    Truck 5108 – Jennifer Sterritt-Smith, graduate of Millis Training School
    Truck 5027 – Russell Thompson, graduate of Millis Training School
    Truck 7066 – Eddie Vandergriff
    Truck 46068 – Jeff Vanstechelman

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    It’s Time to Thank Our Truck Drivers

    In celebration of National Truck Driver Appreciation Week, it is time once again to say “thanks” to our 7.3 million trucking industry employees that help to move America’s freight. “Those who work in the trucking industry or personally know a truck driver understand the important work that these men and women do on the road each day,” said ATA President and CEO Chris Spear. “Truck drivers are safe, dedicated individuals who help provide our daily goods and I hope the public celebrates and thanks all 3.5 million of them…”

    According to the ATA, the trucking industry provides one out of every 16 jobs in America and moves more than 70.1% of the nation’s total freight tonnage. “…more than 80% of U.S. communities rely exclusively on trucking for delivery of their goods and commodities – providing access to 21st century products to both remote rural communities and urban centers.”

    Without truck drivers, we simply would not have access to the things we need—the things that enable us to live healthy and safe lives. Truck drivers do more than just deliver goods; they also fill integral roles in our societies. As noted by ATA First Vice Chairman Kevin Burch, “Truck drivers are incredibly vital to our economy, but they’re also valuable members of their communities, oftentimes serving as baseball coaches, pastors and volunteers. That level of civic engagement is a unique foundation of the trucking industry….”

    As we honor our nation’s truck drivers throughout September, we also take a moment to remember the historical events of September 11th. An important day in our country’s history, it is also one that changed trucking dramatically. According to CCJDigital.Com, the events of 9/11 put even more scrutiny on the application process for HazMat endorsements and other related trucking issues. Now, more than ever, truck drivers play a vital role, not only in transporting goods, but in helping to maintain and secure those goods as well.

    September is a significant month. It’s a time to recognize truck drivers and to remember 9/11. It is also a time when football gets underway and autumn finally arrives. While eventful, it is not so busy that we cannot stop to remember or give thanks for those who do so much for all of us.

    All that we do and all that we celebrate, more often than not, is made possible or stems from the hard work and dedication of those in the trucking industry. With that said, it is with great pride that we say, “Thank You, Truckers” for all that you sacrifice and for all that you give—to the profession, to the community and to the world.

    National Truck Driver Appreciation Week

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Courtesy: What It Means to be a Better Driver

    Little things make a big difference, especially in trucking. It is important to remember the essentials. After the initial training phase, driving can feel like a pair of shoes. The more time spent on the road, the more comfortable things feel. Things can get so comfortable, however, that drivers forget basic courtesies. While it has been said before, we will say it again. What drivers Do Not Do all to often distinguishes the mediocre from the best.

    There are plenty of examples to prove that. For instance, when a driver is attentive, others on the highway are inclined to feel more at ease. We also know that when a driver forgets to utilize a turn signal, it may cause unnecessary concern. At Millis Transfer, we work hard to ensure our drivers never forget the difference the details can make.

    A classic example of a common courtesy that drivers should always follow (when possible) is moving over to the middle lane when trucks or vehicles are merging onto the freeway. When a driver doesn’t do this and stops being courteous, people draw a world of conclusions about the driver and the trucking company. Every decision a driver makes, therefore, reflects on the individual driver as much as the company brand.

    Safe driving evolves from good choices. Good choices save lives. While eating well and exercising are an important part of the good choices we make to be better drivers, we must also know how to avoid common ailments such as “trucker’s shoulder” or repetitive strain injury. We know it is as important to get the necessary rest as it is to eat the right foods. Overall, there must be at least 101 basic rules drivers should practice for a number of different reasons. For instance, flashing your lights to motion to another driver that they can get in front of you is not only courteous, it helps prevent accidents.

    At Millis Transfer, we take pride in knowing we work with some of the most courteous and attentive drivers in the business, drivers who never take the little things forgranted. Drivers who understand little things sometimes make all the difference. Whether it is the simple use of a turn signal or any number of common sense decisions, we’re a family of drivers you can count on to help make the highways a safer, more courteous place to be.

    About Millis Transfer
    Millis Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Cleaner Than The Others…

    There’s an online version of the game show “Family Feud” that asks the question: Name something, that if it could talk, would say “Wash Me.” Think about it for a second. What would you say? It’s probably no surprise that “vehicle” was the top answer, but it’s interesting that the word “truck” was not.

    How many times have you driven down the highway and seen an 18 wheeler with the words, “Wash Me” written on the back of the trailer? Perhaps the truck drivers who write these messages on their trailers are simply reminding the rest of the driving world to wash their “vehicles.” As noted, it is obviously not the “trucks” that need washing in the minds of the survey participants.

    Truckers or those interested in trucking should consider these results–45 people in the survey answered with the word “vehicle.” Only one person in the group answered with the word “truck.” Believe it or not, answers like “floors” and “socks” got more responses than anything related to trucking.

    Like the word “truck” in this survey, trucking is one of those professions people rarely consider. Truth be told, truck drivers are almost “too good” at their jobs. Since people almost never have to do without the essentials that are delivered by them, most people really don’t know what they have until it is not there. More often than not, it is seen as a field that is not so much taken for granted, as it is considered invincible. People don’t think about it because the transportation sector always comes through in the long run. The mindset is generally, “You can count on that.”

    With that said, truckers are “unsung heroes.” When food or supplies have been delayed at processing plants, the sight of an 18 wheeler arriving on location is a welcomed one. Few areas could ever be completely self-sustaining. As a result, the entire landscape of what we know is enhanced by the quiet work performed in trucking.

    A truck driver is frequently described as someone who simply transports goods, but it is not quite so simple. Updated statistics indicate that nearly one in five people are somehow employed through the trucking industry. Truck drivers save lives. They enable production. They put food and drinks on the table. They are the backbone of our society. The core thread that quietly connects us all.

    About Millis Transfer
    Mills Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    A Interesting, Fun Place Along The Highway

    If you haven’t been there already, here’s one place you want to visit: The Iowa 80 Trucking Museum. Filled with an amazing assortment of vintage trucks and trailers, it showcases the progression of trucking throughout the years. At this tourist attraction, visitors are allowed free rein to explore. So, you’ll enjoy having no barriers or rigid directional signs. Admittance is also free, but donations are always appreciated.

    The museum currently has 60 trucks and trailers on display. These span from the early 1900s to the 1970s. Expect to see a little bit of everything when it comes to exhibits—from Mack, FWD, GMC, Studebaker to Diamond T and others. A neat thing about this place is that all the trucks featured in it are actually operational.

    If you have time, the museum also shows a short film that features real life drivers and their passion for the trucking industry. They do something else that is cool—they allow photographs. With that said, be sure to bring the camera and don’t hesitate to post some vintage pictures to your Facebook pages.

    At the moment, the Iowa 80 museum is wrapping up a 100th Birthday party for the 1910 Avery Farm Truck. “The 1910 Avery is the oldest truck we have on display and a rare piece of trucking history, so we thought it very fitting to throw a party,” says Dave Meier, museum curator. For those unfamiliar with the brand, Avery was a large farm equipment manufacturer in Peoria, Illinois, that built farm tractors into the 1920s.

    According to manufacturers, the 1910 model was advertised to do the work of six to eight horses at a top speed of 15 MPH. The truck was so versatile, it could haul up to 100 bushels of wheat, pull a 3-bottom plow, or even run a threshing machine through an additional belt pulley. It didn’t come cheap though; the truck boasted a $2,500 price tag.

    The Iowa 80 Trucking Museum purchased this particular Avery from collector Lloyd VanHorn in 1995, who had purchased it from the Pioneer Auto Museum, Murdo, South Dakota, 10 years earlier. It is one of only six Avery trucks known to still exist. For those who would like to visit, the museum is located in Walcott, Iowa.

    At Millis Transfer, our drivers are easily identified by the glossy, maroon colored trucks that bare the Millis Transfer brand. With the latest amenities, Millis Transfer trucks are built with more features for safety and convenience today than ever before in history. When you drive a Millis Transfer truck and when you take a look at how trucks have evolved at the Iowa 80 museum, you’ll definitely appreciate all the thought the company has put into making the ride so easy and smooth. With all the fun gadgets and accessories that are now available, it’s definitely a great time to be a truck driver.

    About Millis Transfer
    Mills Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information, please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Learning To Drive: Safer & Easier Than Ever

    Learning to drive a truck is a lot easier than it was in the old days, when people had to hand crank one to get it started–a tough endeavor that required numerous precautions to avoid getting kicked by the engine. Braking systems also needed a strong right foot for stopping. To be a driver back in the day, online sources say one had to attend a “brute force school of transportation.” While it was tough and dangerous, drivers somehow learned how to operate one well enough to get to where they needed to be.

    In the early 1900s, most people used a horse and cart. There was no such thing as a “highway.” There were merely roads. Seeing a truck on any of those roads was a rare sight. Sources say there were only about 10,000 trucks in the entire country during that time. Described as cantankerous, they were equipped with solid rubber tires, making drive time rough and sometimes dangerous. Although evolving innovations got people talking about the idea of using more trucks for transport, it was actually the Army that more or less got the evolution of truck manufacturing underway.

    During the war effort of World War I, a reported 227,000 new trucks were produced. The first convoy, led by the four wheel drive truck with a newly fitted cargo box, headed out on Feb. 8, 1912. It departed Washington, D.C. and arrived at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana roughly six weeks and 1,500 miles later on March 28. This was one of the first road tests to see if trucks could haul more efficiently than the horse and cart. Testing revealed numerous challenges. While the journey was rough, it was evident that in the right circumstances, with good equipment and drivable roads, trucking could be a viable solution.

    Throughout the years, innovations continued as manufacturing orders increased. Soon the semi-trailer arrived, making a huge impact on the way freight and cargo were transported. According to online sources, there were less than 15,000 miles of paved roads throughout the country in 1914. During the next decade, the federal government spent $75 million on new road construction. By 1930, an estimated 329,000 long haul trucks were in operation bringing about the 1935 Motor Carrier Act, which presented a set group of regulations for all trucks operating within the country.

    As the truck industry evolved, learning to drive became more of an entrepreneurial endeavor, bringing opportunity and excitement to those who ventured into the field. It was 1936 when brothers Jake & Ray Millis began to follow their own entrepreneurial dream. Driven by the will to succeed, they founded what is known today as Millis Transfer, Inc. Starting as a small distributor, the Millis family grew the company by expanding its territory and focusing on what the company does best: ‘getting it there’.

    About Millis Transfer
    Mills Transfer has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

    Sweet Seats, Old Thrones & Safe Driving

    Seats can be distinctive, interesting portrayals of who we are as truck drivers. Seat cover manufacturers are getting more and more creative, especially when it comes to tractor trailers. There’s clear plastic ones. Leopard stripes. Furry ones. Sleek, professional leather grade. Therapeutic massage units and more. Some are uniquely stylish and others are just outrageous and fun.

    While choosing plain or spruced up accessories can speak volumes about our personalities, it is really the way we sit on our seat covers that makes the biggest difference in our ability to get safely and comfortably down the highway.

    While many drivers take pride in maintaining a very athletic, well postured driving position, others prefer to look a bit more like Archie Bunker, who sat in that old, tattered recliner, which was put on display at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. For those who might be too young to remember Archie Bunker’s chair, it was a major part of the 1970s sitcom “All in the Family.”

    We bring up Archie Bunker because his chair was his throne. He was often filmed sitting in it, with a heating pad and a drink in hand, debating a variety of topics. Raggedy and perhaps a bit lumpy, his now iconic chair, has become a unique piece of art. Back in the day, if he caught anyone sitting in it, he’d go a bit crazy. Ever meet a driver like that? It can be a bit comical.

    No matter the throne you select, keep in mind that your throne can impact both your back and neck, especially while driving. To prevent stress and strain, the American Chiropractic Association recommends the following tips:

    *Vary seat position a little every 30-60 minutes to ease stress on your body.
    *Change hand positions on the steering wheel often. Do not squeeze harder than necessary.
    *Use a steering wheel cover to protect your hands from a cold wheel.
    *Use a gel seat cushion if the truck vibrates too much.

    *Knees should not be higher than the hips.
    *Front of the seat should not contact the back of the knee. Such contact will cause drivers to slide forward into a rounded posture.
    *You should be able to depress pedals all the way without twisting the back or moving away from the seat.
    *If possible, adjust the lumbar area of the seat to provide gentle support. A towel or lumbar roll may be added to support the low back if needed.

    About Millis Transfer
    Mills Transfer, Getting It There Since 1936, has an impressive service record earning the company dozens of “Carrier of the Year” awards. Headquartered in Black River Falls, Wis., Millis is also a Certified Top Pay Carrier with some of the best equipment on the road. Maintenance facilities and drop yards are strategically located throughout the company’s operating area. Its sister company, Millis Training Institute, offers five school locations that provide students with quality training in order to earn their CDL-A license. For more information please visit www.millistransfer.com, www.mtidriving.com or call 1-800-937-0880.

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